Archive | June, 2013

Glastonbury Festival 2013 – Sunday

Tags:

Glastonbury Festival 2013 – Sunday

Posted on 30 June 2013 by Joe

Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds not only own the Pyramid stage after tonight’s performance, they may very well now own the accolade of this year’s best set at the whole event. Resplendent in silk black suit and paisley shirt Cave provided a master class in how to perform at a festival. Each soft moment perfectly placed among the dangerous, violent lyrics and tales of murder that Cave has excelled at throughout his career. A newish song, the brooding epic Jubilee Street, is already a live favourite, as were older classics such as Mercy Seat and a spellbinding encore of Red Right Hand.

Nick Cave crowd shmoozing

Nick Cave crowd shmoozing

The real highpoint though was Stagger Lee, as Cave embarked on one of two attempts to crowd surf/schmooze. As he screamed at those he made contact with about all the things he was going to do to poor Billy Dilly in the song suddenly this pre-Raphaelite looking women appeared. She kept resolute eye contact with Cave throughout as he ended up singing directly to her. This kind of thing is cheesy when someone like Bono does it, but not when Cave gives it a go. As far as I’m aware the U2 singer has never looked into an audience member’s eyes, held her hands and screamed “I’m going to fuck Billy Dilly up his motherfucking ass.”

It was an incredible set, but earlier that day there’d been a few acts that came pretty close. First Aid Kit, first up on the Pyramid stage, were sublime. The two sisters from Sweden are emerging as a  renowned global festival act and deserved their main stage slot. While the sing along to Emmy Lou got few takers by the end the crowd were visibly impressed by the more upbeat King of the World and their stellar version of Simon and Garfunkel’s America.

George Ezra

George Ezra

The nature of Glastonbury, with its vastness and more than 100 stages, is to find yourself both spoilt for choice and in need of a nice sit down occasionally. I opted to spend the afternoon near to the John Peel, BBC Introducing and Gully stages, all within close proximity of each other and offering ample sit down space. First act I caught was one of my highlights of the day – Bristol singer George Ezra. Young, with just a guitar, his voice is something to behold, deep and quite frankly stunning. He’s got an edge too, that puts him little bit more in the Tallest Man on Earth camp than say Ed Sheeran.

Next on the BBC Introducing was a special surprise guest. Last time I was wooed with such a promise I was cruelly let down when the Rizzle Kicks took the stage. This time it was a far more impressive guest, none other than The Other Stage headliners The XX. Their set was brief but I almost by the end got why there’s so much hype about them. Well, almost.

Psychedelic folksters Villagers, the project of singer songwriter Conor J. O’Brien, over at John Peel, are one of those bands that have passed me by in recent years. On this evidence I’ll be looking at them more closely. Great set, with O’Brien proving a captivating and precise singer.

The XX at BBC Introducing

The XX at BBC Introducing

West Papua’s struggle against human rights abuses is one of the world’s ills that I only found out about today thanks to Melbourne reggae/funk act Blue King Brown, whose members are from this Indonesian province and at one point were joined on stage by West Papua independence leader Benny Wenda. Sitting in the sun, beer in hand, listening to this superb band and being educated was just about as perfect as a perfect Glastonbury moment can be.

Public Service Broadcasting

Public Service Broadcasting

Before Nick Cave I popped over to William’s Green, a smallish tent venue, to see one of the most fun acts I’ve seen  – Public Service Broadcasting, aka J. Willgoose, Esq on keyboards, banjo and guitar and Wrigglesworth on drums. Flanked by a giant old TV they essentially mash up public service broadcasts with awesome prog rock and electronica. It’s a devilishly simple combination made better live by Willgoose using public service broadcast samples for stage banter with excellent effect.

Unlike all those acts I saw today,  Mumford and Sons had to follow Nick Cave. I didn’t wait around to find out how their brand of bland folk rock fared.

by Joe Lepper

 

Share

Comments (0)

Glastonbury Festival 2013 – Saturday

Tags:

Glastonbury Festival 2013 – Saturday

Posted on 30 June 2013 by Joe

Quick weather check. Yep, still sunny for the rest of the weekend. With the midday sun shining brightly down it was time I tried something I haven’t done so far at Glastonbury; it was time to finally see an act at the Pyramid stage. The honour of my very first Pyramid stage experience went to Billy Bragg, one of my favourites and an ever-reliable festival performer.

Sunshine at the Pyramid Stage

Sunshine at the Pyramid Stage

Buoyed by the success of his most recent album Tooth and Nail, Bragg was in fine mood mixing tracks from that album such as the lovely Handyman Blues with firm favourites from the past. Sexuality, New England and Ideology all delivered with a huge dollop of political banter. For me though the high point of his set were the Woody Guthrie numbers, including All You Fascists Are Bound To Lose and the simply wonderful California Stars, created through a collaboration with Wilco in the Mermaid Avenue  albums.

Next up was another first, a trip to the Croissant Neuf tent, tucked away by the Green Fields and herbal tea drinking part of the site. It’s a superb venue, like a pirate circus tent and made even better by a quite simply spell binding set from Stealing Sheep. Last time I saw them they supported Field Music in Bristol and I declared them the best support band I’d ever seen. A year or so on from that and they are even better, even slicker and punchier as they pounded out their completely unique brand of surf/folk/pop. Certainly the best act I’ve seen so far at Glastonbury.

Stealing Sheep

Stealing Sheep

The Park was the next port of call to be surprised by the awesome ballsyness of Haim, the all female American indie pop band that are a firm favourite of BBC Radio 1. The venue was packed as they proved there was far more to them than their promising singles Forever and Falling. They even managed a cover of Fleetwood Mac’s Oh Well and did a pretty fine version of it too.

Devendra Banhart next on the same stage was another revelation. Laid back in places, rock in others. He sounded and looked nothing like I imagined live; more like a skinny as a rake Lou Reed. Despite some sound problems with the bass his set made me want to check out his recent albums, which I’ve managed to avoid somehow. Another surprise was what a sex symbol he appears to be from the screaming women at the front.

Steve Winwood

Steve Winwood

To end my day I opted for a trio of old fogey acts. Firstly it was over to the Leftfield tent to see former MC5 man Wayne Kramer play a solo set blending songs from his old group mixed with modern, bittersweet tales of rock. Secondly it was a little trip over to one of my favourite venues, the giant circus tent sized Acoustic Stage, to see Steve Winwood. The man is a legend, arguably England’s greatest ever male soul singer and ridiculously talented. This precocious talent was bossing the vocals with the Spencer Davis Group as a teenager and then went on to form Traffic and Blind Faith, the latter with Eric Clapton. Tonight his voice was as sensational as I expected it to be as his stellar soul funk band astounded us with their musicianship on Winwood hits such as Keep on Running.

Commanding oblique views of The Rolling Stones

Commanding oblique views of The Rolling Stones

Finally it was the day’s big draw, The Rolling Stones and back over to the Pyramid Stage to find a very different venue. At a rough estimate I’d say a good 100,000 of the festival’s 175,000 or so ticket holders were there. As a spectacle from my vantage point it was incredible, looking on at the sheer size of the crowd. However, as a gig it was complete pants, watching these tiny old stick men in the distance, almost entirely blocked out by giant, silly  flags. I only knew it was them because of the giant screens on either side of the stage. So yes, that’s right, I was basically watching tele with 100,000 people. I’m not saying that the experience wasn’t good though. They may have been going through the motions as a band but this was undeniably one of the major music events of the year and it felt good to be part of it.

by Joe Lepper

Share

Comments (0)

Glastonbury Festival 2013 – Friday

Tags:

Glastonbury Festival 2013 – Friday

Posted on 29 June 2013 by Joe

The heavens may have opened on Thursday to create what has become ‘typical Glastonbury weather’, but thankfully that looks like it for the rain. The weather, a major preoccupation among those attending Glastonbury, looks perfect for the rest of the weekend and Friday was no exception.

Beady Eye

Beady Eye

After cycling in on the Friday morning I decided to take a wander over to the Other Stage, the festival’s second major stage and wonder why the devil it was so packed at 11am. Within minutes, bandy legged and sun glassed on stepped Liam Gallagher and I realised I was in for a surprise Beady Eye gig. Now at this point it is usual music journalist practice to be all prissy and declare anything Liam or his brother Noel do as boring and tired old rock. To my surprise though I didn’t completely hate their set, with its horns and synths fleshing out the clear lack of any quality songwriting. Liam, for all his faults has undeniable attitude and their cover of Oasis’ Rock n Roll star was pretty good.

Over to the BBC Introducing stage next for something that’s more our cup of tea, Brighton band Milk and Biscuits. This septet, with flute and trumpet, play joyous, simple indie pop that Magnetic Fields fans will love. An album is due out this year and we’ll definitely try and get a copy to review. Really promising new band.

Milk and Biscuits

Milk and Biscuits

Kodaline, at the John Peel stage, provided one of the unintentional highlights of the night. The Irish epic indie rock act, think Keane in skinny jeans, had volume problems with the vocals. Cue the biggest heckle I’ve ever seen at Glastonbury as thousands of people point to the sky and shout up a  “up, up.” Like a footballer who scores only to realises moments later that he was off side and its been disallowed the band slowly realised that the fingers waving in the air where instructional to the sound man not a show of praise. They left in a huff and returned minutes later apologetic. Sadly though the volume didn’t help. Still sounded like Keane, so I left.

Over at the BBC Introducing there was another comedy moment.  The surprise guest at 3pm turned out to be hip-hop-lite duo Rizzle Kicks, introducing by Nick ‘grim’ Grimshaw. Those under 17 were enraptured, those over left. Their backing band were pretty nifty though.

Martha Wainwright

Martha Wainwright

As the afternoon passed into evening, more wondering took place taking in a heart-warming set from Billy Bragg, together with Martyn Joseph and other artists  taking part in one of his round up sessions at The Leftfield Tent. The Spirit of 71 for a reggae DJ set by Don Letts and enjoyed by Harry Enfield and some tall pantomime dames on stilts was another strange place I ended up.

The acoustic tent was next for a breathtaking set from Martha Wainwright, full of light hearted tales of family angst and a voice and guitar playing like an orchestra that filled this friendly venue with tracks such as Factory and Four Black Sheep.

The Park stage, featuring Dinosaur Jr

The Park stage, featuring Dinosaur Jr

The evening over at the Park was sensational for this aged indie kid. Dinosaur Jr put on a stellar festival set, playing all their hits as Freak Scene, Just Like Heaven and The Wagon. Django Django also know how to wow a festival crowd, leaping on stage in matching white and black zig zag shirts their hour set formed mainly of tracks such as Storm and Wor from their self tilted debut album were sensational. Geeks, who know how to blend dance music and guitar pop well, come round rarely and should be cherished.

Final act of the night for me was Portishead at the Other Stage. All those tracks  from Dummy eased out of this band as if the last 20 years or so had never happened with Beth Gibbons remarkable voice captivating the crowd. It has been a great, eclectic festival so far. Looking forward to the next two days.

 by Joe Lepper

 

Share

Comments (0)

The National – Roundhouse, London (June 26, 2013)

Tags:

The National – Roundhouse, London (June 26, 2013)

Posted on 27 June 2013 by Joe

Disclaimer: this is less a review, more a love letter to The National. They’re one of my most favourite bands ever. They’ve been a big part of my life these past few years, a soundtrack on repeat as I’ve travelled about London and beyond.

So I was glad to spend an hour and a half trying to get tickets when the surprise gig at Roundhouse was announced a couple of weeks ago, so I could see them live for the first time.

Such a cliché, but it was everything I hoped it would be. There’s nothing like being in a crowd of people who absolutely adore the act they’re seeing, and that was definitely the case last night. A tightly controlled ticketing system limiting buyers to two ticket vouchers only, which were to be exchanged for wrist bands with photo ID at the box office meant that the sold-out gig was tighter to get into than Miles Kane’s trousers, but also meant die-hard fans had their day and touts were left high and dry.

IMAG2581

The Brooklyn-based band performed for a solid two hours, playing heavily from the magnificent new album Trouble will find me ,  as well as dropping gems from their back catalogue, like Fake Empire, Squalor Victoria and Apartment Story from Boxer as well as Secret Meeting, Abel and Mr November from Alligator. It was 2010’s High Violet that gave them their biggest success before this new album, and they played Terrible Love, Conversation 16, and of course, England from that, among others. But the real highlight for me? I have been waiting to see them do Bloodbuzz Ohio live for a long time, and it was just spectacular – driven, emotional, epic.

Before they started I was chatting to the guy next to me who said the new album was one of two halves – the first half being ‘the singles’, which he preferred. I think he has a point, but I think the more I’ve listened to it, the more I’ve liked the latter half, and Pink Rabbits, done so beautifully last night, is fast becoming one of my favourite tracks. As is Humiliation. But Sea of love and Graceless were phenomenal, as was Don’t swallow the cap, I Should Live in Salt and first single, Demons.

I am rapturous, I know, but why do I love them so much? It’s the introspective, intensely felt lyrics and Matt Berninger’s unbelievable, extraordinary voice that’s capable of great, deep baritone sensitivity and screaming heights. It’s also the raw, what I like to call ‘man emotions’, that come through in the songs, the fantastic metaphors and imagery (‘I was just soaking my head to unrattle my brain’), the below the surface anxieties, worries and fears layered over the wonderful, interesting phrasing and arrangements. Then there’s Bryan Devendorf on the drums. He is so good. Listen to Brainy from Boxer to know what I’m talking about.

The lighting was superb too, and I swear there wasn’t a dry eye in the house when Berninger got down into crowd to lead a music-free singalong to Vanderlyle Cry Baby as the final song of the night. It lifted the roof of the Roundhouse.

by Patricia Turk

 

Share

Comments (0)

Leonard Cohen – O2 Arena, London (21 June, 2013)

Tags:

Leonard Cohen – O2 Arena, London (21 June, 2013)

Posted on 27 June 2013 by Joe

It’s 7:30pm. The lights go down, and dark silhouettes spider quickly on stage to a frothily excited crowd. With barely time to plug in, Cohen and cohorts launch into “Dance me to the end of love” and the quietest stadium show ever witnessed.

A few calls of “Turn it up” go disregarded, so 20,000 pairs of ears just listened harder.

Cohen’s songs don’t need anthemic volume. They bring you closer to yourself rather than each other, and it’s in that that their universal appeal and commonality exists. They are songs you have always known – one suspects that archaeologists will one day dig up some palimpsest in a Jordanian desert and find Cohen’s lyrics written out in cuneiform, centuries before chromatic scales or Lydian modes were ever conceived.

leonard

So it’s not so strange that this master of word and song somehow achieves such intimacy in this vast gawping hall of 20,000 “friends” as he refers to us here at the O2.

With the volume turned all the way up to 6, it’s a masterful trick. You can hear the audience gently singing along, rapt in their own interpretations and memories sprung from a stream of classics floating past: Bird on a wire, Everybody knows, Who by Fire, and we have barely got started.

Cohen’s rich baritone vocals are interspersed with his self-deprecating wit – abundant in not only lyric, poetry and performance (with a truly comic keyboard solo) but also in his between-song patter. And his spoken verse is just as spell binding as song, with the great hall drinking up every last syllable of “A thousand kisses deep”.

Alongside Cohen is assembled a troupe of master craftsmen (and women), particularly in the guitars of Javier Mas and keys of Neil Larsen. Mostly they are contemporary-ish in age to Cohen, and you might expect this low-key affair to have all the intensity of a Saga holiday.

Nothing of the sort. Cohen down on knees opposite the fire-fingered Mas, working his archilaud into a tonal frenzy made for some jaw dropping highlights.

If this reads like a Leonard Cohen love in – then no apologies, that’s exactly what you get. No support act, just three hours or so of the master at work. No rewriting of classics to seek out new audiences – in fact the one negative would be that the majority of the audience had clearly carried Cohen’s canon in their heads and hearts for years, decades even – there were very few young acolytes.

For an icon nudging towards 80, a self confessed recluse at the end of a multi year tour who can still put out an inspired performance – well if you can’t make the effort to catch him now, you’re missing out on music’s core curriculum. It’s time to get educated.

by Matt Whipp

Share

Comments (0)

The New Mendicants Plan UK and Ireland Tour

Tags: , , ,

The New Mendicants Plan UK and Ireland Tour

Posted on 24 June 2013 by Joe

Teenage Fanclub’s Norman Blake is back to his collaborative tricks again, this time teaming up with Joe Pernice, of The Pernice Brothers, and Mike Belisky, The Sadies’ drummer. This newly created trio is called The New Mendicants and formed in Toronto, where Norman Blake moved to last year.

Joe Pernice (l), Norman Blake (r)

Joe Pernice (l), Norman Blake (r)

This month they are touring the UK and Ireland with dates at:

7th           Dublin, Whelans

8th           Cambridge, Cambridge Portland Arms

9th           Bristol, Colston Hall 2

10th         London, The Lexington

11th         Nottingham, The Glee

12th         Birmingham, The Glee

13th         Manchester, Deaf Institute

14th         Hebden Bridge, Trades Club

15th         Glasgow, Mono

Also released this month is their debut EP Australia 2013, which contains an INXS cover as well as versions of Teenage Fanclub’s ‘I Don’t Want Control Of You’ and The Pernice Brothers ‘Amazing Glow’. An album is pencilled in for a 2014 release..

This latest collaboration for Blake follows his  2011 partnership with Gorky’s Zygotic Mynci’s Euros Childs, under the name Jonny.

Watch out in early July for our review of their Bristol performance.

by Joe Lepper

Share

Comments (0)

Little Orchestra – Clocks

Tags: ,

Little Orchestra – Clocks

Posted on 20 June 2013 by Joe

A Little Orchestra’s debut album Clocks manages to both confirm and surprise expectations in one go.

Formed a couple of years back and still led by Monster Bobby of The Pipettes, its four violins, viola, cello, flute, clarinet, and bassoon, make it quite literally an orchestra of diminutive dimension.

ALO+Clocks

Published on Vollwert Records, Clocks follows EP Josefina, released April 2013 on Elefant, and features such a list of guest vocalists as to ensure that its train of wistful, nostalgic, anglo-indie-phile songs roll through your speakers like carnival floats in a northern town.

The album’s 11 tracks feature collaborations with Haiku Salut, Gordon McIntyre (Ballboy), Lisa Bouvier (The Proctors), and Darren Hayman, peppered with modulations on its eponymous Clocks ‘theme’ which shows off its orchestral heart.

Stand out tracks? Difficult to nail down. Certainly ‘Treacle, you should probably go to sleep’ (with Simon Love, from The Loves) has a great hook, beautiful swathes of cinematic strings and is the most unlike any of its sibling tracks. The stunning vocals of ‘Josefina’ (with Model Village) and ‘East Coast’, a moribund tale featuring McIntyre’s deadpan delivery are other highlights.

If you find yourself on a sun-blighted beach in foreign climes and need to be transported back even temporarily to the ordinary everyman’s England for 40 minutes or so, this is the medicine.

6/10

by Matt Whipp

Share

Comments (0)

Mark Mulcahy – Dear Mark J Mulcahy, I Love You

Tags: ,

Mark Mulcahy – Dear Mark J Mulcahy, I Love You

Posted on 15 June 2013 by Dorian

When one of your favourite artists returns to recording music after an extended break it is pretty exciting, when the product of that comeback turns out to be the equal of any of their past records it is something a little bit special.

Mark Mulcahy spent the 80s and 90s as the singer with the band The Miracle Legion achieving critical acclaim and moderate sales before they split and he went on to a solo career where further critical acclaim and even more modest sales followed. In 2008, after the sudden death of his wife, he stepped away from music to concentrate on looking after his twin daughters. It is a mark of the respect that the music community have for his work that the likes of Thom Yorke, The National, Michael Stipe and Mercury Rev recorded and released a tribute album, Ciao My Shining Star, in order to raise money so that he was able to continue recording music.

Dear Mark J Mulcahy, I Love You

It is my pessimistic expectation that Dear Mark J Mulcahy, I Love You will yet again fall into the critically acclaimed, largely ignored by the recording buying public camp yet again. It is a pretty exceptional album from start to finish, filled with great tunes, thoughtful lyrics and a typically excellent vocal performance. On balance it could be his most consistent set of songs to date.

This is a classic guitar pop album, other than  some nice flutes and a few keyboards (well, a lot of keyboards on the lovely ‘Bailing Out On Everything Again’)  it sticks pretty close to the bass, drums, guitar and vocals formula that Mulcahy has perfected through his career. This is no reinvention of the artist, this is a first rate musician doing what he does best and seeming more relaxed and comfortable in his performance than ever.

Some reviewers have pointed to a dark undercurrent in the songs, something that has always been present on his recordings, but if anything this seems to be a pretty positive and confident recording. Mulcahy states that the sings were recorded one at a time, going in to the studio one Saturday a month over an extended period to capture the eleven tracks for the album. The songs were perfected one by one, leaving the studio when they were happy with the song being recorded that day. This certainly seems to have worked as each of the songs seems fully realised and complete, there is no filler on this record. They were also mixed by 90s alt-rock legend Paul Q. Kolderie and the songs sound great, crisp and clean with no hint of over-production.

The album contains some of the poppiest tunes that Mulchay has recorded, with ‘Poison Candy Heart’ being top 10 in my alternative universe chart run-down and ‘She Makes The World Turn Backwards’ should be available in every karaoke booth round the country (for the call and response moments at east).

Mulcahy is an excellent singer, with a distinctive and emotional voice, a voice that is capable of drama and theatrics when he he wants to. He is too clever a performer to overdo things though, no Mariah Carey histrionics for him, and it is only on the wonderful ‘Let The Fireflies Fly Away’ that he really lets his vocal chords go. There is so much personality in his songs and performances throughout that he doesn’t need to fall back on any vocal tricks to get the listeners attention.

Mark Mulcahy makes a rare visit to the UK this August for a handful of gigs. My advice is to buy this album and get tickets to those gigs. Join a small but happy group that knows that Mark Mulcahy is one of the best songwriters around, and hopefully help to pursuade him to take less than eight years to come back with more  music.

9/10

By Dorian Rogers

Share

Comments (0)

Neko Case – Man

Tags: , , ,

Neko Case – Man

Posted on 13 June 2013 by Dorian

Neko Case is a bit of a Neon Filler favorite whether that be with her role in the New Pornographers, playing wonderful live sets or on her own solo albums.  The last of these was Middle Cyclone which made it in to our top ten albums list when released in 2009.

So we are very excited that she is back after more than four years to release The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You via ANTI on the 2nd September. Case says of the album:

“My brain wilderness is more dense and dangerous than I thought,” says Case. “It was an embarrassing and hilarious march, but I now feel like a more streamlined being. It’s a good feeling. Four years of my life took ten years hostage, then gave me back twelve.”

The album was executive-produced by Case and recorded at Wavelab in Tuscon, as well as Portland, Los Angeles and with Phil Palazzolo in Brooklyn. Tucker Martine, Case and Darryl Neudorf mixed the album, with backing by guitarist Paul Rigby, bassist Tom V. Ray, vocalist Kelly Hogan and multi-instrumentalist Jon Rauhouse. Other guests include M. Ward, Steve Turner, Howe Gelb, and members of The New Pornographers, My Morning Jacket, Calexico, Los Lobos and Visqueen. In addition to eleven new songs written by Case, The Worse Things Get… features a cover of ‘Afraid’ by Nico.

The first song from the album. ‘Man’, featuring M.Ward on guitar, is available to view below and gives good reason to be excited about what is likely to be one of the best albums of 2013.

By Dorian Rogers

Share

Comments (0)

Röyksopp – Late Night Tales

Tags: , ,

Röyksopp – Late Night Tales

Posted on 12 June 2013 by Joe

At last, XTC’s track The Somnambulist has finally been picked by a Late Night Tales compilation curator.

This perfect late night song is one of a number of reasons to be delighted with Norwegian duo Röyksopp’s turn to select 20 or so tracks to listen to in the wee small hours.

tumblr_inline_mniov1rrfd1qz4rgp

Another is they’ve really got a handle on what makes these compilations great. There’s some fine atmospheric music for late night listening such as Vangelis’s Blade Runner Blues and also some surprising blasts from the past such as Acker Bilk’s Stranger On The Shore, which really works here.

They also have a good sense of fun as well, with Richard Schneider Jr’s ridiculously Austen Powers-esque Hello Beach Girls providing giggles and innuendo aplenty.

Johann Johannsson’s Odi Et Amo is another brooding, wonderful addition to a compilation series that excels in introducing the listener to a band’s record collection and obscurities. Where else would I be able to hear Thomas Dolby’s Budapest By Blimp alongside John Martyn’s Small Hours for the first time?

Even This Mortal Coil’s ‘Til I Gain Control sounds good under Röyksopp’s curation before it’s time to end the compilation as all those in the series do, with a little short story, this time part two of Flat of Angles, read by Sherlock Holmes himself Benedict Cumberbatch.

A funny, interesting and wonderfully electic addition to one of our favourite compilation series.

9/10

by Joe Lepper

 

 

Share

Comments (0)

Advertise Here

Photos from our Flickr stream

See all photos

Advertise Here