Archive | February, 2015

The Wave Pictures – The Green Door Store, Brighton (Feb 25, 2015)

Tags: ,

The Wave Pictures – The Green Door Store, Brighton (Feb 25, 2015)

Posted on 26 February 2015 by Dorian

Time is against me this week but I don’t want to let an excellent Waves Pictures gig go by without a mention. In the absence of a full review I’d like to present five bullet points and a few pictures.

  • Support was nicely provided by The Creaking Chair. It would be lazy journalism by me to mention Syd Barrett era Pink Floyd, so I won’t.

  • Don’t chuck a pint over the band. Don’t do it at any point and least of all during the first song. I don’t care how excited you are. Don’t.

  • How does David Tattersall play so well even down to four guitar strings? I’d have been interested to see how he’d have faired if the set had been longer and more had broken.

  • What a great three piece band this is. The rhythm section is as superb as the guitar work and The Jam spring to mind. Even though they sound nothing like The Jam.

  • Isn’t it great when Jonny Helm stands up and sings? Passionate balladry at its best.

The Creaking Chair

The Creaking Chair

 

The Wave Pictures

The Wave Pictures

 

The Wave Pictures

The Wave Pictures

 

The Wave Pictures

The Wave Pictures

Do try and see the band live, they are great on record but even better on stage. The good news is they gig a lot, the bad news is they often sell out. It looks like they may have some tickets left for Ramsgate this Friday (27th Feb) and they are back in London (after a European tour) on the 18th June.

By Dorian Rogers

Share

Comments (0)

Steak Number Eight, Thought Forms, Sons of Bill – Various Venues, Nottingham (Feb 21, 2015)

Tags: , , ,

Steak Number Eight, Thought Forms, Sons of Bill – Various Venues, Nottingham (Feb 21, 2015)

Posted on 23 February 2015 by John Haylock

Tonight I was torn between staying in and watching some incredibly scintillating TV, you know the usual Saturday numbfest of The Voice, Casualty and The National Lottery Live results or actually going to see some live music, it really is a no brainer, and I opt for the latter. What’s more I’m bouyed by a 4-1victory for Nottingham Forest earlier in the day and the substantial winnings from a scratchcard so I embark upon a Southern Comfort fuelled night of musical shenanigans in Nottingham.

First up is a visit to the Rescue Rooms, to check out two support bands on the current Marmozets tour, so Steak Number Eight come on first. Put it this way, they wouldn’t go down well at a folk club; four dishevelled looking young lads in black, with some nice baseball boot action going on and some de rigeur long hair, discovering the joys of screaming alot and playing simplistic riffs for half an hour as loud as your amp will go before exploding into tiny pieces.

Thought Forms

Thought Forms

One of the many highlights from Greenman Festival last year was the unplanned discovery of Thought Forms, they blew me away with their trippy guitar sounds and ear bleeding vistas of sonic beauty. So imagine my joy at seeing they were on the bill with The Marmozets as well. The venue DJ had the good taste to be playing Loveless by My Bloody Valentine over the PA between bands, and very appropriate it seemed to. Thought Forms’ Charlie, Deej and Guy are given a measley 30 minutes to impress, it’s not nearly long enough and I question the logic of putting them on a bill like this. It’s a bit like putting Stephen Fry on Channel 4 teen drama Hollyoaks. Thought Forms might be a bit cerebral for a crowd pumped up for some Barnsley punk rock (although to be fair, they told me later that they really dug The Marmozets energy and kick ass fury and were enjoying themselves enormously).

A little after 8pm and Thought Forms go for lift off. Deej, the bearded animated guitarist, entices feedback and mayhem from his big box of effects buttons and pedals, looking every inch the coolest guitarist on the planet. Charlie on the other side of the stage is his female equivalent, but thankfully without the beard, and sandwiched between them is Guy Metcalfe who must be one of the most inventive drummers around. He almost plays with a jazz sensibility and it subverts the songs and makes them more intriguing and original. Due to the time restraints the band squeeze in only six numbers, three of which are from their mighty 2013 ‘Ghost Mountain’ album (now available on re-pressed vinyl) namely, the title track, Landing and Only Hollow, the other numbers included For the Moving Stars, Sound of Violence and Silver Kiss. Where on the album there is light and shade, exploiting to great effect the quiet/loud dynamic, live they attempt to go for the jugular – imagine an explosion in a Sonic Youth factory. Quite what the crowd of post punkers thought of this I’m not sure, but nobody got stabbed and I heard a number of whoops, some of which weren’t by me. Love these guys.

Sons of Bill

Sons of Bill

A swift exit, leaving a heaving Marmozets crowd going bonkers I made my slightly lurching way toward a venue called The Maze, it’s small, it’s hot, it’s got more beer, and it’s home to a devoted gang of like minded individuals who’ve been putting on nights under the moniker of ‘Cosmic American’ for over a decade now. Tonight’s draw are Sons of Bill, a fine bunch of five friendly guy next door musicians, three of whom are brothers and who purvey a wonderful line in country tinged rock. They area a little like Midlake, but with more firepower, they really were superb, beautiful harmonies, well crafted tunes and a guitar player in Sam Wilson who really knows his way around a guitar. Their current album is called love and logic, I loved them and logic tells me, you will too.

An entertaining bus ride home involving an argument over an open window, people being strangled and a wife shouting ‘leave him Barry, he’s not worth it!’ all added to a truly memorable night. And it didn’t finish there, at 1:30AM I found myself getting off the late bus and stumbling into a late night pub and within five minutes singing “You’re the one that I want,” from Saturday night fever. I ought to go on The voice. My head hurts.

by John Haylock

Share

Comments (0)

gaz-bg

Tags: , , , ,

Gaz Coombes To Headline Field Day Festival

Posted on 19 February 2015 by Joe

Ex Supergrass man Gaz Coombes has joined shoegazing royalty Ride and the legendary Patti Smith as headliners at this year’s Field Day Festival.

Coombes will be playing material from his new Matador album and will doubtless drop in a few Supergrass classics as well.

gaz-bg

Spread over two days at London’s Victoria Park, they will join acts such as Mercury prize nominees FKA twigs,  Hookworms,  Savages and Tune yards . At the event Patti  Smith will be performing her groundbreaking 1975 debut ‘Horses’ in full.

More acts are due to be announced in the coming weeks.

Field Day takes place over 6-7 June. Tickets are on sale at www.fielddayfestivals.com. Early bird weekend tickets cost £78.

Share

Comments (0)

Taylor Locke – Time Stands Still

Tags: ,

Taylor Locke – Time Stands Still

Posted on 19 February 2015 by John Haylock

Taylor Locke used to be the guitarist and vocalist in Rooney, a bigger over there than they are over here, American rock band, who’ve been going since 1999 and have at least four albums under their belt.

TL_taupe_cover__1_

I love surprises and Time Stands Still is a big, classy feel good musical surprise. Locke makes music that is optimistic, engaging and very pretty in a laid back mellow James Taylor, early Todd Rundgren vibe, all beautiful vocals , steel guitars and irresistable hooks, with lovely ballads like So Long and No Dice.

There’s even  room for some upbeat power pop with Running Away From Love and The Game. I’m reminded of the first time I heard Jonathan Wilson, yes it’s that good.

The influence of The Beatles,  even ELO can be felt on the rocking Call Me Kuchu and the gently psychedelic Don’t be a Stranger.  It’s a little bit retro but what the hell, when it’s done this well it’s a sheer unalloyed pleasure from start to finish. The sound of the new West coast.

8/10

by John Haylock

Share

Comments (0)

Troyka – Ornithophobia

Tags:

Troyka – Ornithophobia

Posted on 17 February 2015 by John Haylock

Warning! This review contains references to jazz so anyone offended by this four letter word is advised to look the other way now.

Troyka, as their name implies are a three piece, who peddle a brand of tough-to-pigeon-hole jazz-rock fusion, and feature Chris Montague on guitar, Joshua Blackmore on percussion and Kit Downes on keyboard.

26346-ornithophobia

I’ve just finished reading the late Ned Sherrin’s autobiography and it occurred to me that on the long running BBC Radio Four arts programme Loose Ends that he hosted for a number of years Troyka would be perfect musical guests for its beard stroking teatime intellectual audience.

Ornithophobia, which I’m reliably informed is a fear of birds, is their second album and comes hot on the heels of last years acclaimed ‘Moxxy’.

I’ll admit that reviewing this has taken my out of my comfort zone as I listen to its modern jazz squeaks, honks and tinkles. But there’s enough to draw me in with its smart vocal sampling and some nice King Crimson-esque guitar riffing and noodling. Indeed, 1980s era King Crimson (circa ‘Discipline’ and ‘Three of a Perfect Pair’) are a good comparison. Another point of reference is Frank Zappa as are Soft Machine and the more experimental side to Radiohead.

Among the most accessible tracks are ‘Bamburgh’, ‘Seahouses’ and ‘Thopter’ which act as a good entry point for a band that makes a welcome musical diversion from the current crop of identikit pop drivel. If you want to step out of your comfort zone, and are willing to try something refreshing and a little demanding then this album could be for you.

By John Haylock

Share

Comments (0)

The Wave Pictures – Great Big Flamingo Burning Moon

Tags:

The Wave Pictures – Great Big Flamingo Burning Moon

Posted on 16 February 2015 by Joe

Is this the best rock n roll album of the year? Sure, it’s only February but we’ve checked that Kanye West is not around so now’s as good a time as any to start dishing out controversial accolades.

I hereby declare this 13th studio album by this once Leicestershire now London based trio, the best rock n roll album of the year.

There’s a raft of reasons for this bold declaration. In part it’s the uplifting high tempo tracks full of awesome guitar riffs, with the opening on Pea Green Coat among many standouts with Dr Feelgood pub rock feel.

wavepictures

It is also the attention to detail in guitarist and lead vocalist David Tattersell’s marvellous lyrics, such as on Telephone where the bleary eyed protagonist of the song is in a sleeping bag in a hallway at “The Pattersons” listening to the telephone ring three storeys up while looking at the “cigar smoke circle on a blood red wall”.

There’s a strong focus on story telling across the album as well which makes it utterly likeable as each track’s narrator seemingly stumbles through bizarre situations, romance, hungover stupors, hallways of giant homes and police cells.

The addition of painter, musician and all round arty chap Billy Childish on co-writing and co-production duties is clearly a key factor in its energy and strength. Another is it being a natural extension of their down and dirty blues influenced previous album City Forgiveness. The two Creedence Clearwater Rivival covers Sinister Purpose and Green River on this album act as a nice nod back to that album.

It feels tightly controlled under Childish’s direction as well with the songs never wearing out their welcome and Tattersall’s excellent guitar solos kept shorter to give them an even more dramatic effect. Childish is also responsible for  Pea Green Coat’s incredible opening riff, possibly the album’s best moment.

Bring all this together and it creates what all great albums do, transcend being simply a collection of tracks and create a world you can immerse yourself in, or in this case a world you can stumble drunkenly into.

9/10

By Joe Lepper

Share

Comments (0)

Tigercats, Fever Dream and Seadog live in Brighton 27/03/15

Tags: , , ,

Tigercats, Fever Dream and Seadog live in Brighton 27/03/15

Posted on 12 February 2015 by Dorian

Neon Filler is delighted to present Tigercats and Fever Dream on the Brighton leg of their forthcoming tour. Support comes from the excellent Brighton band Seadog.

The gig is at The Joker in Brighton (view map) and is on Friday 27th March (Doors 8pm).

Tickets are £6 (plus outlet booking fee) and are available from Wegottickets, Gigantic and Brighton Source online.

If you are in Brighton why not get a nice paper ticket from Resident records? Whilst you are in there you can pick up a copy of the excellent new Tigercats album Mysteries.

If you are going to come along to the gig then why not make yourself known on the Facebook event page?

Tigercats

Having carved out a coveted space in the scuzzier realm of kinetic indiepop, London five-piece Tigercats have now delivered second album Mysteries, an assuredly contagious record bristling with melody and noise, and mapped out on a lyrical landscape populated by gated longings, bleached-out city skies, and skewed entanglements of the heart.

Tigercats

Tigercats make music that stems from the weird collision point between Half Japanese, Hefner, Daniel Johnston, Prince, and Orange Juice, shuttling through this heady constellation armed with a pop sensibility marked out by its eloquence and ferocity. Duncan Barrett and Laura Kovic articulate sweet laments and aspersions over swathes of magnetic agit-glam-punk noise which prowls an alternately feral and refined musical terrain.

Find out more at www.tigercatsband.com and check out the video to the song Junior Champion.

Fever Dream

Feted for the urgency and unrest of their live presence, London three-piece Fever Dream have now committed their dark and brittle post-punk-shoegaze noise to tape in the form of debut album, Moyamoya.

Fever Dream

Comprised of guitarist/vocalist Adey Fleet, bassist Sarah Lippett, and drummer Cat Loye, Fever Dream make music which stalks the unsettled territory between MBV and PiL; suffused with melody and discordance, unhinged and brutally stapled-down. Via the twitching fragility and freneticism of Fleet’s guitar and vocals, Lippett’s stormy bass, and the propulsive dark heart that is Loye’s drumming,Fever Dream pitch disorientating swathes of noise against irresistible pop hooks and gentle febrile tonality, arriving at a sound which sharply articulates a disorientating world of panic attacks, tender allegiances, and sweet perversions.

Find out more at www.feverdream.co.uk and check out the video to the song Flux.

Seadog

Seadog is the project of Brighton-based musician and song writer Mark Nathan Benton. Seadog began with Benton at the nucleus of an ever-changing cast of musical friends where each performer would bring their own piece of imagination to the music.

Seadog

Now established as a band with a regular cast, Seadog combine their musical ideas, fusing delicate acoustic lullabies with anthemic electric and acoustic textures.

Seadog have a strong presence amongst the Brighton music scene and have supported a number of acts over the years; including Erland and The Carnival, Blue Roses, Pink Mountain Tops and David Bazan (Pedro The Lion). They recently toured in the UK with Norwegian Songsmith Kenneth Ishak (from Beezwax) by playing as his backing band as the main support on the bill each night.

Find out more at http://seadogmusic.tumblr.com/ and listen to (and buy) the new Transmitter EP here.


 

Share

Comments (0)

Picturebox – The Garden Path

Tags: , ,

Picturebox – The Garden Path

Posted on 10 February 2015 by Joe

From the off there’s a real sense of fun on this follow up to 2013’s Home Taping by Robert Halcrow, aka Picturebox.

Now part of the Gare Du Nord stable of artists Canterbury based Halcrow has retained his lo-fi roots but this has more of a full band feel with Alex Williams, Ben Lockwood and Ian Button (Papernut Cambridge) joining him for this hugely likeable slice of guitar and synth pop.

picturebox

Opener A Nicer Man, with its Blur like turns of phrase, such as “he’s unflappable, Mr affable”, sets the scenes well as the pop tunes that follow like Graffiti and Happy Ending show a keen ear for melody. Fancyman, a theme to an imaginary 70s sitcom and involving music technology students from Canterbury College, is another highpoint.

It’s not all fun though, there’s a bit of an awkward bitter lover monologue on In Yr Dreams 2Nite that provides a sombre interlude among the jollity. While jarring it is perhaps necessary though as he gives a sense of reality to an otherwise whimsical album that after all is inspired by Canterbury, which has its share of real life problems beneath its Medieval veneer.

For those that enjoyed his Graffiti EP, which we reviewed late last year, this nine track album offers  a more than welcome chance to hear more from an artist that deserves to be heard far beyond Canterbury’s city walls.

8/10

by Joe Lepper

Share

Comments (0)

Viet Cong – The Green Door Store, Brighton (February 8, 2015)

Tags: ,

Viet Cong – The Green Door Store, Brighton (February 8, 2015)

Posted on 09 February 2015 by Dorian

There is definitely a real buzz around Viet Cong right now. The band have a highly rated new album, a sell-out tour and an interesting back story to their credit. What they don’t have is that many great songs, just yet. This isn’t meant as a criticism as they haven’t released that much music yet. About three songs from their Cassette EP and five of the seven songs from their debut album are all  pretty great, but that does only amount to eight songs in total.

Viet Cong

The first set of songs come from the EP and ‘Oxygen Feed’ is just as wonderful a piece of twitchy pop music live as on record. The feeling that everything is about to collapse, but never does, is part of the songs charm and a key element of that EP. In contrast the songs from their album sound assured and ordered, they sound like a band that has decided on what it wants to be.

Different songs fare better in the live environment, with ”Bunker Buster’ in particular shining tonight as a wonderful piece of sonic bombast. ‘Continental Shelf’ in contrast loses the perfection it displays on record, the driving bass and drums are all there, the chiming guitars sound great, but the subtlety of melody, especially in the vocals, doesn’t quite come through.

In general though the band perform this brilliantly, and have enough humor about them on stage to offset the dour edges of the music. Album finale ‘Death’ is a particularly fine live performance and captures the bands best elements in 14 noise-filled minutes. The instrumental break in particular is fantastic, the repetition of sound is hypnotic and takes the audience to the edge of tolerance before breaking back into the song.

The only flaw here is that the song ends but it isn’t yet time to end the set and the band is persuaded to play another song, and this rather dulls the impact of their magnum opus.

The set lacks surprises, you know exactly which songs they are going to play from their slim catalogue. It feels like a festival set, not a headline, and it would work perfectly at an ATP festival or as part of the Great Escape.

These are minor criticisms though of a pretty great set from an act that is establishing themselves as one of the real bands to watch. We need to hear more from them to be sure if they are the real deal, but I’ll be first in the queue when they release their second album.

By Dorian Rogers

Share

Comments (0)

Tigercats – Sleeping In The Back Seat

Tags:

Tigercats – Sleeping In The Back Seat

Posted on 05 February 2015 by Dorian

Tigercats have just released a video for the song ‘Sleeping In The Back Seat’ from their excellent new album Mysteries. Watch the video below:

The band are on tour with Fever Dream in March and April, including a date in Brighton (promoted by Neon Filler) on the 27th March.

See the tour poster below for full dates:

Tigercats tour poster

Share

Comments (0)

Advertise Here

Photos from our Flickr stream

See all photos

Advertise Here