Tag Archive | "Ralfe Band"

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Video Premier: Oly Ralfe – A Forest In The City

Posted on 08 October 2018 by Joe

Ralfe Band’s Oly Ralfe has shared a new video for ‘A Forest In The City’, which appears on his debut solo album Notes From Another Sea – a collection of piano instrumentals.

The video has been filmed in his studio in Oxfordshire as well as on location in nearby Wychwood Forest.

The video release coincides with a show taking place at St. Pancras Church, London, on October 10 (tickets) when Ralfe will be performing songs from the album, along with a six-piece classical ensemble. The show is a collaboration with orchestrator Luke Lewis.

“I think of this album as a pathway through mysterious places; I hope it can unlock the beauty and strangeness of what’s around you,” said Ralfe.

“I see emotions as pictures and pictures as music, and each of these tracks is a conjuring of an indistinct yet intense place, and my music is the soundtrack to that. When I am inspired I find myself gravitating towards the piano, and through it I’ve opened myself up more than I have before.”

Notes From Another Sea is available on vinyl limited to 500 hand-numbered copies worldwide, CD and digital.

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Ralfe Band – Son Be Wise

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Ralfe Band – Son Be Wise

Posted on 29 July 2013 by Joe

My son, be wise, and make my heart glad, that I may answer him that reproacheth me….so sayeth proverbs 27.11. Is that what the title of this new Ralfe Band album refers to?

Well, I don’t do reproachethness, but I do like a nice tune written by Oly Ralfe.  This is his third studio album, not including the soundtrack to the film Bunny and the Bull. No radical departures, no sidesteps into dubstep, no sudden collaborations with Radiohead, no, just more quirky folky hanky panky, perhaps a little more fleshed out than previous outings, but refreshing nonetheless.

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Oly has such a distinctive timbre to his vocals, which is not immediately lovable, sounding parched and remote but repeated exposure reveals complexities and compassion, he makes everything sound like a confession, and then he throws in a fabbo wobbly chorus to die for, Barricades, Ox  and Hidden Place, all display his skills perfectly, there’s also sullen beauty here in the form of Magdalena and especially the heartfelt Kings and Queens, ditto Dead Souls. Ladder, with it’s lonely piano and yearning lyric is a distinct highlight, perfectly suited for a little bit of navel gazing.

Oly is taking kitchen sink dramas into the countryside and giving them some warming broth. I suggest you would be wise to join him.

8/10

By John Haylock

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